East’s party culture: a discussion and a doughnut giveaway!

Recently a team of ECHO staffers investigated the reality of party culture at East versus what students thought the reality would be.

In September, we conducted an anonymous poll of two Senior and two Freshman English classes. We asked students first to tell us about how often they believed their classmates consumed alcohol, tobacco products, marijuana, as well as other drugs and stimulants. We then asked students to indicate how often they themselves consumed these same stimulants.

The results of our survey were unexpected, to say the least.

Overwhelmingly, East students believe their classmates consume alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other stimulants substantially more than they actually do.

This shocking information raised one question: while East students do party, why is it that overall our impression of East party culture is so skewed?

Take a look at the stats in “Everyone Parties” in the first issue of the ECHO, and post your responses or comments on anything related to the following questions:

What do you think of East’s party culture – is it excessive or in control?

Do the statistics in the ECHO surprise you? Do you think they’re accurate? Why or why not?

Why do you think our impression of East party culture is skewed?

We are giving away a dozen doughnuts (Krispy Kreme, of course) to one  comment randomly chosen out of all the legitimate, thoughtful comments.

Leave your name and/or email address, and we’ll contact you if you’re the lucky winner of the doughnut deliciousness!

19 Replies to “East’s party culture: a discussion and a doughnut giveaway!”

  1. Very interesting article and statistics! If accurate, the differences between what students think others do, and what they really do, are quite stunning. Can one of the poll-takers elaborate on your methods? For example, did all (or most) students in each class respond, or could students “opt out” if they didn’t want to reveal their behaviors? Again, fascinating and great job!

    1. We checked with both Ms. McGinnis and Mr. Wilson (AP Statistics teachers at East) and both said that interviewing two classes, one honors and one non-honors would be sufficient for representing the entire class. If you think about it, when a national poll is conducted, only a few thousand are polled and those opinions represent the entire US population. Same is true for each grade level and the classes we interviewed. – Jamie Emmerman, Special Features Editor

    1. We interviewed two English classes from each grade level, one honors and one non-honors. We ran our methods past both Ms. McGinnis and Mr. Wilson (AP Statistics teachers at East) who said our polling method would give an accurate account. The poll was completely optional and anonymous. In terms of people lying, we have no way of knowing for sure. We do know however that our data for East turned out to be close to the national average, so that inclined us to believe that students told the truth.

  2. The statistics really surprised me, I feel that the Echo should definately have sampled more students. Otherwise interesting article. Doughnuts?

    1. We checked with both Ms. McGinnis and Mr. Wilson (AP Statistics teachers at East) and both said that interviewing two classes, one honors and one non-honors would be sufficient for representing the entire class. If you think about it, when a national poll is conducted, only a few thousand are polled and those opinions represent the entire US population. Same is true for each grade level and the classes we interviewed. – Jamie Emmerman, Special Features Editor

  3. I think these views are skewd for several reasons. For one thing, the partying darma and gossip is what goes around school, not the drama of the people who obey all of the rules. So we are exposed to stories of partying quite often. I also think they are skewd because not everyone tells the truth. People may think of someone as a rule-breaker, when in fact they are not, or the opposite could happen.

    1. We agree! The reason why the ECHO preformed this survey is because we believed the drama and gossip of partying at school was playing up the frequency of it, and in actuality the majority of people weren’t getting drunk every weekend like students thought. The results of our survey supported that theory, and the point of the spread was to prove that people do not actually party as much as we students think we do. – Jamie Emmerman, Special Features Editor

  4. Yeah theyre skewed Because you always hear about the people who do stuff like that and never about the people who don’t so you think it’s normal

    1. Yes, our poll found that student perception of partying is skewed when compared to the reality. This is the point of the spread! – Jamie Emmerman, Special Features Editor

  5. Man why is this so surprising? A reason why drug culture is so wide spread is because our parents raised us to believe things about drugs which in most cases aren’t true so as soon as little billy smokes weed for the first time he realizes that everything his parents have been telling him about weed may not be true, and since there’s no one to tell him otherwise he also takes the same approach to more dangerous and destructive drugs such as crack or heroin. so the best thing to do is to be truthfull with our children and stop trying to tell them lies in a disparate attempt o scare them away from drugs. And also there’s the punks who just want to fit in and be “cool” and only do it because the hip hop culture glorifys it. I feel sorry for those people they should find a new hobby and just be themselves..no one thinks your cool just because you use drugs its your personality if anything. So just think for yourself and live your own life.

    *Edited for profanity

    1. I understand you editing out the profanity, I should have picked my words more professionaly but you also took huge chunks of the comment out to the extent that part of the point that I was trying to get across is distorted and the merging of the two separate comments(the “and also” part) doesnt make sense. I was trying to draw a line between the people who are naturaly curious about drugs and use it for their personal gratification and the people who use it for the sole purpose of being seen by others thus creating the situation brought up in the article where people are exaggerating and lying about their drug use, which is really a attempt to show off to their peers in hopes of gaining greater acceptance and is not wise because a) they should be living their own lives and not be worrying about what others think of them, and b) because a friendship only based on drugs, in reality isn’t a real friendship. Ofcourse I myself don’t use drugs and haven’t used any in 33 years but I’m just trying to provide a non-bias point of veiw on the issue

      1. It was difficult to edit the profanity and still have it make sense. Sorry, I did the best I could! Future reference to everyone: don’t use profanity in your comments, we won’t be able to publish it! – Jamie Emmerman, Special Features Editor

  6. East was new to me at the beginning but now i love it so so so so much that i don’t want to leave east. I love my friends and I love the people there. It’s an awesome school. They have much more than my old school that’s what makes this school the best in the whole world. Theres no other school like east chapel hill. They always have activitys going on at this school.

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